Tag Archives: Sprint

1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta 1600 Sprint

The Giulietta Sprint is a tidy little coupe and would foreshadow the next two decades of rear-drive coupe awesomeness to emerge from Alfa Romeo. This 1962 Sprint for sale in San Diego was originally an import from Italy and after 40 years, still wears its original paint.

1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta 1600 Sprint

This red Alfa was imported from Italy in about ’68 or ‘69 by a David Gemora who owned a machine shop in Tarzana, California. His main business seemed to be building prototypes for government agencies and according to his family he travelled extensively in Russia and China. After he died his wife gathered the kids together at their Woodland Hills home and said, “Now I can tell you what your dad did for a living." His children didn’t know until his death that he was involved in optical surveillance/global espionage with the highest private security clearance available from our government.

Mr. Gemora and a young family friend named David Skora worked on the Alfa at Gemora’s shop from about 1970 onward. Gemora and Skora rebuilt the engine and clutch in the early seventies along with performing other mechanical work to keep the car in good fettle for daily driving chores around Southern California. The car was painted in lacquer at that time also. Young Skora had always desired the Giulia and upon Mr. Gemora’s death in about 2005 was able to purchase it from the family. I purchased it from Mr. Skora.

Today: The paint work is very shiny, like a ruby but there are cracks and miscellaneous dings and dents here and there consistent with 40 year old paint and lacquer especially (the cracks). We have done everything needed to bring it to good mechanical fettle including but not limited to: New brakes, water pump, front engine seal, driveshaft support, flex disk, belts, hoses, fresh air ducts, rear suspension limit strap, carburetor kit, rod out radiator core and more…..(some of these items needed to be performed due to sitting in storage for the long period before Mr. Skora’s purchase)

She drives very nice and one does not have to jump through any hoops nor engage in any special shifting techniques to change gears smoothly. The engine starts easily, pulls strong, does not smoke or drop any large amounts of oil. When reversing briskly one needs to rest a hand upon the shift lever to keep it in place.

Inside there is a lovely period Nardi wood rim steering wheel. Also, there is a very cool, period anti-theft devise on the steering column (built in like it belongs there). There are two photos of it on the photo page. It snaps into place and you use a key to unlock it. I’ve never, ever seen one like it before. This car has a sound structure but is not virginal perfect. At first glance the undercarriage it appears to be rock solid but if one presses upward on the floors they seem to be thin. If one scrutinizes very closely some small perforations can be found. The floor in the trunk under the battery has the usual perforations as well.

I recognize that I am rather fussy with vintage cars and that everyone does not wish or have the resources to drive fully dialed in cars. Some would simply forgo this metal work and drive the car as is. For those in that category a discount can be arranged and this car can be continued to be used just the way it is as a pleasant daily driver. $47,500

The seller misidentified this car as a Giulia; in fact, that was the model to succeed this Giulietta. The last Giulietta Sprint we featured was priced just under $50,000, but that was a well sorted, tastefully modified example. With the few issues this car has I'd suspect it would be more realistically priced in the low $40,000 range.

-Paul

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT

The 105/115 series Alfa Romeo Giulia coupes are the poster child for the practical Italian sports car. A bit more conservative than a Spider, less flashy than a Ferrari, these handsome two-doors had staying power in the Alfa lineup. Sold from 1963 through 1976, there were a number of variations, differing in styling touches and what was motivating them under the hood. This early Giulia for sale in Denmark is exactly how I would order up mine: in red, with some tasty alloys and a Cloverleaf on the C pillar.

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT

Presented in 1963 the Giulia Sprint GT was the first model of Bertones new design for a small Alfa Romeo GT coupe to follow the highly succesful Giulietta from the mid-fifties. Designer Giugaro gave it the caracteristic 'stepnose' front. In 1966 the Veloce version was presented. Four extra horsepower from 105 BHP to 109 BHP from the 1600 engine, bucket style sports seats and some detail trim as imitated wood veneer on the dashboard and three horisontal bars on the front grille, set the more expensive Veloce from the standard Giulia Sprint GT.

We have known this Veloce for more than 15 years. 1st owner in Sweden was a dentist who had the car for decades. He had it cosmetically restored in Sweden sometime in the late 80s. In the early 90s it was sold to its second owner and came to Denmark for a mechanical overhaul. The local mechanic never finished the car and we bought it five years ago. Now it is totally restored: body, interior, engine, gearbox, suspension, brakes etc. New paint job to a very high standard in correct Alfa Rosso 501. Although one can not speak of mathing numbers with Alfa Romeo a Sprint GT Veloce should have engine type code 536. This one has not only the correct type 536. The series number is also within that interval that corresponds with this chassis number. This is as 'matching' as it gets in the Alfa world.

13,471 of these fine cars were produced and together with a 1750 GT a Sprint Veloce ranks perhaps as the most sought after model of them all, except for the very rare and prohibitively expensive GTA. This gorgeous two owner car has Danish papers and as such taxes (VAT) withing the EU are paid (not deductible).

Good Giulias and GTVs can be found in the high teens and can close in on $40,000 for the very best of the best. The asking price for this GT Sprint is just about right, if a tad high, considering the two owner history, condition and Veloce trim level.

-Paul

1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Normale

Of all the Alfa Romeo Coupes, I've always preferred the Giulia 105/115 series coupes above the rest. But this car, a Giulietta Sprint Normale, has me looking at the Giulia's predecessor in a different light. For sale in California, this car looks absolutely amazing in green with Panasport wheels. Oftentimes larger wheels on a vintage car doesn't work too well but the stance here is perfect. It's hard to believe this design is almost 60 years old, because trimmed out in this manner, the look transcend decades.

1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Normale

Verde Muschio with Cognac interior, 1750 CC with 40 millimeter Webers, equipped with a five-speed gearbox, four wheel ATE disc brakes, Bilstein shocks, 15 inch Panasport wheels, 25 millimeter front sway bar and ATL fuel cell. A very attractive and nicely restored 101 series Sprint with rally style upgrades. $49,500.

At almost $50,000, this Giulietta Sprint is one of the most expensive that I've seen on the market. The last Giulietta Sprint we featured about a month ago was 1959 model for sale at a Ferrari/Maserati dealer. That car was listed just shy of $40,000. A good, restored example will usually bring somewhere between $35,000 and $40,000. While this car certainly presents well and has some desirable updates, I couldn't see paying over $45,000 for it.

-Paul

1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint

When a manufacturer introduces a new car range, a sedan is usually the first to be unveiled. Not so with the Alfa Romeo Giulietta. The Giulietta Sprint coupe was the first model in the range to appear, unveiled at the Turin Motor Show in 1954. With an all alloy twin cam four cylinder and tidy Bertone styling, this was an advanced car for its time. While the Giulia GTV that succeeed it might have eclipsed it in popularity, these cars have merit in their own right. This mint example for sale in Illinois is a great opportunity for someone looking for a car they can use or show right out of the box.

1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint

Beautiful Giulietta Spring with a 1600 engine with twin Webers and 5-speed transmission. No rust California car. Painted many years ago and still shows really well. Interior redone with seats from a '67 GTV. The car is also equipped with 4-wheel disc brakes, Centerline sport springs, headers and sport exhaust.

Prices for Sprints these days are hovering around $40,000, so for a clean example such as this, the asking price isn't way out of line. These cars are known for their tedious electronics and, like all Italian cars, propensity to rust, so a thorough inspection would be a must.

-Paul

1983 Alfa Romeo Alfasud Sprint 1.5 QV

The Alfa Romeo Alfasud is an interesting car. It acquired a bit of a bad rap due to mechanical malfeasance, but with over one million vehicles sold, is one of Alfa Romeo's most successful models in its history. This car was the product of a joint venture between Alfa Romeo and Finmeccanica and a new plant was set up in the south of Italy as part of a labor agreement, hence the "Sud" part of the car's name. This 1983 model is the last year the Alfasud moniker appeared. After that, this car was called simply the "Sprint" as its lifecycle wound down in the late 1980s. Alfasuds weren't the heartiest of vehicles; as a result, many have disappeared from the roads, primarily due to rust issues. This survivor in Rome has an astoundingly low 22,000 miles on the clock, but I'm not sure I'd call the green carpet "bella."

1983 Alfa Romeo Alfasud Sprint 1.5 QV

Alfa Romeo Alfasud Sprint 1.5 Quadrifoglio Verde, 105 hp, four-wheel disc brakes (front inboard). 1983 model year, white, upholstery in good condition, beautiful green carpet, very nice body paint, well functioning mechanically. One owner until 2010. New tires added in 2012.

At $5,800, there's other ways of getting into a classic Alfa Romeo but perhaps not with such little mileage or in such great condition. So what'll it be then? A slightly tatty Spider or a mint condition example of what some consider a forgettable Alfa. For me, it would probably be the Spider but for all the Alfasud's faults, the later Sprint iteration is charming in its own right.

-Paul

1966 Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint

It's unfortunate, but big Alfas never get the proper respect they deserve. Ironically, the smaller models, like the Spider, GTV and Alfetta garnered more of the attention over the years, when there were perfectly good gran touring machines at the top of the range. While based on the smaller 2000 range, the 2600 had an all aluminum, 2.6 liter twin cam six cylinder engine, good for 145 horsepower. Available in Berlina, Sprint or Spider configurations. A little over 11,000 were produced from 1961 through 1968, with the majority (almost 7,000) being the Sprint version, or coupe, you see here.

1966 Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint

1966 Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint Coupe by Bertone

Chassis No. 825680
Engine No. AR00601*07668*

SPECIFICATIONS:
2.6 liter all-alloy DOHC Inline 6 with triple Weber DCOE 45 carburetors and 5 speed manual transmission, disc brakes all around. NOTE: A hand-written notation in registration with Automobile Club D’Italia cites it as a “2600 Super Sprint”.

Original Color: Bianco Spino
Original Mileage: 68,800 KM

Sadly the time has come to sell my beautiful Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint. The 2600 Sprint is considered to be one of the simplest and usable Grand Touring cars of the 1960’s. Introduced to the public at the 1962 Geneva Motor Show, the 2600 (106 series) was seen as the flagship for the marque with its newly developed all-alloy in-line six-cylinder motor. Displacing 2,584cc it was lauded for being a remarkably smooth engine that was well mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. The Sprint name was given to the Bertone-bodied coupe. To me the 2600 Sprint is the reason an Alfa is an Alfa. Which are known for its smooth ride, handling, smooth shifting and great performance. They are just so much fun to drive!

This car has had much care and attention. It has nice paint and all original well preserved interior. The color combination is beautiful and the mechanicals are very good. The previous owner to me repaired the bottom of the door sills and the paint does not match exactly to the rest of the car. I just had the Weber Carburetors completely rebuilt and tuned, the brakes completely serviced, it has new Bilstein shocks, new Limiter straps, new clutch master cylinder, and rebuilt fuel pump. My mechanic says it will probably need a new throughout bearing because you can hear a slight jingle from the clutch. The car has power windows, seat belts, and is overall a good quality driver. I have driven it on many back country roads and it is truly a joy! The engine bay and the under carriage are nicely detailed and the trunk is very clean with the spare tire and jack in the right locations. I have not seen any rust on this car. It is very solid throughout. This is not a perfect car, not a show car, simply a good quality driver.

Note: This is a 1966 titled as a 1967. Clear Texas title in hand. Beautiful Touring Italian sports car!
Excellent candidate for vintage tour and rally events! Very original throughout! Recently serviced, brakes, and nicely tuned weber carbs. starts right up with no smoke! Original interior, spare wheel/tire, and jack! Advertised locally for: $39,500.00. Selling with NO RESERVE to the high bidder.

This 2600 is an outstanding example of a little known Alfa Romeo on these shores. The patina on this vehicle is just right; a few scratches here and nicely worn leather to go in hand with that legendary twin cam six mill under the hood. It has also received a proper amount of mechanical and cosmetic attention. I'm a big fan of the Giulias from the period, but this Sprint has me rethinking which vintage Alfa Romeo is my favorite.

-Paul

1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint

Introduced in the mid-1950s, the Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint was an interesting model in that the coupe was the first to debut at the Turin Motor Show, followed by sedan and convertible variants. Even a rare station wagon variant by Carrozzeria Colli was built, with just shy of 100 examples seeing the light of day. Designed by Bertone, this was one of the first Alfa Romeos to be mass produced and earned the reputation as one of the most nimble handling, balanced machines of its time. The coupe variant is not particularly rare, with approximately 25,000 produced. This example for sale outside of Philadelphia was owned by the DuPont family until 2001 and comes with many spare parts.

1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint

I finally got the Sprint back running and on the road. So, now it's time to put it up for sale.

Here is a brief history of it:
- Car was purchased by someone in the DuPont family (the chemical company) – originally robins egg blue with blue(?) interior
- Car was sold to someone, but then repurchased by the DuPonts again (Baird DuPont)
– It was subsequently painted dark blue, then pininfarina red
– It also had the interior redone at some point in brown vinyl with basket weave fabric inserts – very 70’s.
- It was also conveted to a 5spd at some point.
- It's engine was swapped out for a 1600 from a Spider. I sold the Spider long ago for parts. I have the original 1300 (which supposedly was rebuilt with a 1400 kit and never run). That engine goes with the car. The 1600 has a vintage Mallory distributor.
- In 2000 or 2001, Baird DuPont advertised the car in the local (Delaware Valley) Alfa club classifieds (I was running the club and website at the time, so handled the ad). On a whim, I called about it and purchased it along with a ’63 Spider and a bunch of parts from him. I’ve owned it since.
- After purchasing it, I needed to go over the brakes, replace the exhaust and a few other items to get it running/driving.
- I haven’t done much to it since, other than maintenance and putting on a Weber carb. I drove it to NH in 2004 for the Alfa Convention and drove it regularly until about 2010 when the head gasket went. It’s sat in my garage since then.
- In December 2011, I pulled it out to get it ready to sell. Yesterday, I finally got it back on the road again. The brakes are a bit dodgy - need to be gone over from sitting so long.
- The car is pretty well preserved, probably due to the fact that it was sprayed everywhere with cosmoline (or something like that). It’s been hit in the front – the hood, grill, bumper and both front fenders were replaced at one point. There is some rust bubbling in the front quarter panels where the new fenders were brazed in with a lap joint. On the positive, the front bumper is beautiful. It’s been hit in the rear also – the trunk lid was repaired and the rear bumper replaced. The rear bumper is perfect, but it does not have the reflectors on the fenders. Other than the front fender bubbles, there is a small bubble on the lower rear fender. Other than that, the car is rust free as far as I can tell.
- The interior is deteriorating – it is not original anyway. Both front seats are torn. The headliner has a hole in it above the driver door. The tach does not work. One of the gages has the lettering falling off. The car does, however, have a rare rear seat which is very nice. The rear seats are in good condition.
- The glass is fine.
- Bumpers are near perfect. The grill has a small ding that can be taken out. The trim is fine. The airplane is pitted. The door handles are also pitted, but not as badly. The front fenders do not have the marker lights on them. The hood does not have the spear on it. One tail light lens has a hole in it – don’t ask! I have the trim for the hood and rear reflectors. I don't have the side marker lights.
- As mentioned before, the 1600 needs a head gasket. The transmission is fine. Brake MC was rebuilt a couple of years ago and some of the wheel cylinders were replaced – not all.
- The car would come with spares, most of the missing trim, the 1300 engine, and some new parts like window seals. Depending on selling price, i will also include a spare trunk lid, hood, rear glass and other Giulietta parts I have.
- Overall, it is a solid car that can be enjoyed with very little work. However, if you intend to show it, it would need a complete restoration. My plan was to take it off the road and redo it, back to its original colors. Unfortunately, I have neither the time nor the energy anymore to seriously think about restoring it. While I love the car, I need to simplify and both it and my ’74 GTV must go. I’m still holding on to the ’74 GTV race car, for now.

- I'd like to get $20K for it and the spares package.

While not a concours example, this Giulietta is rather complete and not horribly rust ridden as some examples you see that are on their last legs. This car has a lot of potential and it says a lot that the current owner drove it from Pennsylvania to New Hampshire for the Alfa Convention. This would make a nice, affordable project car for an enthusiast to turn into better looking, but perhaps not show quality driver.

-Paul