1967 Maserati Quattroporte

The sedan, or berlina in Italian, has always been kind of the standard bearer in a vehicle lineup. Unlike coupes, convertibles and estates, they are cars that serve a wide variety of purposes for different people. In the past few years, companies such as Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagen have sought to spice up the sedan by producing what has become known as the four-door coupe, what you could consider a sedan with a bit of an attitude. But there's been one long, standard bearer of the sedan with an attitude genre that has only recently gained wide notoriety: the Maserati Quattroporte.

The Series 1 Quattroporte was vastly different than its contemporaries, with bespoke looking styling by Frua and power dealt out in spades by a 4.1 liter V8. This was one of the first motorcars that could comfortably cruise at 200 km/h (125 mph) for long stretches. In 1967, a larger, 4.7 liter engine was offered before production came to a halt in 1969. In total, a little over 700 of these four-door Maseratis were built. This example for sale in Hamburg, Germany was originally delivered in France, hence the yellow headlamps, and looks sumptuous in metallic gray over burgundy leather.

1967 Maserati Quattroporte

Dark gray metallic, dark red leather, manual transmission, 4.7 liter, delivered new in France, beautiful original interior, two previous owners, partly restored on well-preserved original base, extensive documentation of work performed over the last 40 years.

We only featured one other Series 1 Quattroporte on this site, and it was listed at about half of the asking price of this example last year. At almost $80,000, we're closing in on what a brand new Quattrporte will cost you, but that would be like comparing apples to oranges. Sure, both are great ways of having your sports car cake while piloting a more practical sedan, but this Series 1 Quattroporte is a great chance for the discerning collector to purchase something different that would instantly put your good taste on full display.

-Paul

1978 Lamborghini Silhouette P300

Derived from the V8 powered Lamborghini Urraco, the Silhouette is one of the most rare Lamborghinis ever produced, with 54 examples having the left the factory between 1976 and 1979. Only 31 examples are known to still exist. Improvements over the Urraco include increased horsepower (260) from the 3.0 liter V8 and a targa roof, making this the first production Lamborghini to have a removable roof. While they were never sold new in the US, this 1978 Silhouette for sale in Wisconsin was sold new to an Arab prince and was subsequently brought to the US in pieces and rebuilt to fly under the DoT radar.

1978 Lamborghini Silhouette P300

This rare and stunning 1978 Lamborghini Silhouette P300 is one of the estimated 31 remaining of only 52 ever built between 1976 and 1979. The Silhouette is the lowest number of production Lamborghinis made on a year to year basis except for the 400GT and Reventon. This Silhouette is well known among the Lamborghini community and has been featured in the book The Complete Book of Lamborghini by Peter Lyons and has a great history. It sold new to an Arab prince in the Middle East and later sold to a gentleman in Los Angeles who disassembled and imported it into America as a parts car (hence the rebuilt title) as the Silhouette was never produced for the U.S. market and thus was not EPA/DOT approved at the time. Upon arriving in the U.S., the mechanic-owner reassembled the car, got it running in top condition, and owned the car for approximately 7 years before selling it to another gentleman who owned it 20 years until 2012. The current owner has decided to change the focus of is collection, which creates a rare opportunity for a Lamborghini enthusiast. With only 15,738 miles, this is likely not only one of the lower mileage examples in existence, but also likely one of the most pristine cosmetically in existence. Below is a detailed description illustrating how pristine this Silhouette is in all aspects:

Exterior: The previous owner subjected the body to a top-quality complete Glasurit repaint approximately 15 years ago. The paint remains in the concourse condition it was in when it won its class at Concourso Italiano as it has been carefully preserved and driven approximately only 2,000 miles since that time. The exterior trim is also in pristine condition and there is no rust. The original Campagnolo magnesium Bravo wheels are also pristine and feature correct decals. An online portfolio of 88 photos that illustrate how spectacular the condition is available to interested parties who provide me with their email address.

Interior: The carpet, headliner, leather seats, mouse-hair dash, instrumentation, interior trim, seatbelts, switchgear, and period-correct Alpine am/fm cassette stereo are in such a pristine state that entering the car makes one feel as though they are back in 1978. The air conditioning, power windows, and all electrical items are fully functional.

Engine/Transmission: The original transversely mounted 3.0 liter all aluminum-alloy Lamborghini engine idles exceptionally steady and pulls aggressively and smoothly throughout the entire RPM range during acceleration. The engine has been fastidiously detailed and leaks no fluids. The transmission is very tight and shifts smoothly into all gears.

Valuable Extras: The long-term owner’s obsession with preserving this Silhouette is evidenced by the large number of original NOS and spare parts he accumulated and saved with the car to ensure there would have replacements available if ever needed. Included is an original pair of Pirelli P7 285/40/15 rear tires, an a/c compressor, a window regulator, several carburetor parts, gaskets, ignition parts, oil filters, and many other items (see photo). These items are not only handy to have, but also very valuable.

Summary: This 1978 Lamborghini Silhouette P300 is the ideal example for the Lamborghini enthusiast who demands the best and understands the it is financially prudent to purchase a vintage Lamborghini that is in top-condition as one can spend two to three times the purchase price of a “driver” or “project car” to bring it up to the standard this example is in, yet still have a high mileage car. This Lamborghini should easily pass any rational pre-purchase inspection with flying colors.

The Urraco is one of the most affordable Lamborghinis, with prices spanning the $30,000 to $50,000 territory. Since the Silhouette is essentially an updated, more exclusive version of the Urraco, the values are naturally a bit higher. A Silhouette in similar condition with a little over 20,000 more miles sold at RM Auctions in August 2010 for just over $60,000. Given the lower mileage and passage in time, the asking price here doesn't seem that much out of line.

-Paul

1978 Maserati Kyalami Convertible

If the Maserati Kyalami we featured yesterday wasn't rare enough for you, then this drop top version should sate the appetite for exclusivity. Only two of these convertible Kyalamis were built by a German specialist. This Kyalami Convertible for sale in Cologne, Germany has the smaller 4.2 liter V8 and has me lamenting the fact this variant was never produced on a greater scale. If only their coffers were as deep then as they are now under Fiat ownership.

1978 Maserati Kyalami Convertible

The Kyalami has been at the Geneva Motor Show 1976 presented to the public. It was named after the famous race track in South Africa. The bodies were usually built at Embo in Turin, and initially visited one of this car with the world-famous 4.2-liter DOHC V8 engine, the already celebrated in racing successes. The engine was equipped with 4 Weber dual-downdraft carburetors, dry-sump lubrication and made according to factory specification 265 hp. In 1978, a single convertible version of the Kyalami Frua was prepared.

This Maserati Kyalami Maserati convertible was a recognized specialist in Berlin on the inspiration of the design-Frua rebuilt as a convertible. Extensive accompanying article from the literature report of this unique project. The Frua car is considered lost. Thus, this unique piece is unique in perfect condition and offers the ambitious sports driver to a very exclusive Italian V8 Sport Cabriolet experience with space for 4 people. The sound of the domesticated former V8 racing machine is a treat for the connoisseurs and lovers of the brand Maserati. The color combination of dark blue metallic, and bright in fine leather-lined interior that meets the highest standards of aesthetics. This is a manual switch, with power windows and an electric-hydraulic deck. The Scuderia Colonia Sportiva is proud to be able to offer this unique Maserati convertible.

The asking price of €99,500 (~ $133,000) is quite eye watering considering what closed roof Kyalamis and Longchamps fetch these days. For someone seeking an offbeat Italian exotic, however, you'd be hard pressed to find something as uncommon as this. This is certainly a car that would have the judges scratching their heads at just about any car show you would attend.

-Paul

1980 Maserati Kyalami

Looking back at Maserati's history, it's rather remarkable that the cars with the Trident badge are still with us to this day. After a divorce from parent company Citroën in the mid 1970s, Alejandro DeTomaso came in to save the day and controlled the company into the 1990s. It was during this time that DeTomaso introduced the Longchamp, a GT coupe powered by Ford's Cleveland V8. Maserati was given their own version of this coupe, with its name coming from the famed South African racetrack. Instead of an American engine under the hood, however, you will find either a 4.2 liter or, in the case of our feature car, a 4.9 liter V8 from Maserati's own parts bin.

The Kyalami was a sharp looking car, and quite rare, with under 200 built from 1976 through 1983. As a result, this is a relatively obscure car to even the most hardcore automotive enthusiasts, which is a shame, given how capable this coupe was. For sale in Vienna, this restored Kyalami looks sharp in metallic red and offers a glimpse into the days when Maserati was on the edge of extinction.

1980 Maserati Kyalami

Perfectly restored collector's vehicle, extremely rare, recent service.

In comparison to its sibling, the Longchamp, the Kyalami usually brings just a bit more in terms of value. This is mainly a result of its Italian engine under the hood. A good example like this should run anywhere from $35,000 to $50,000. With a manual transmission and a good quality restoration such as this, I'd suspect this car is worth somewhere around $45,000.

-Paul

1984 Lancia Beta 2.0 Volumex Coupe

Does a standard Lancia Beta Coupe seem a bit too ordinary or reliable for your tastes? Knowing how ridiculous that statement sounds, it might seem a bit more reasonable upon glancing at this late model Beta 2.0 Volumex. Toward the end of the Beta's life, Lancia decided to add a Roots type supercharger into the mix for better performance. Capable of producing 135 bhp and the expected increase in torque over the normally aspirated 2.0 liter engine, the VX as it was known differed from its lesser engined siblings by way of a hood bulge and front and rear spoilers. Stiffer suspension was also a part of the package. Just under 1,300 VX Coupes were made; this rare Beta is on offer in Italy about 30 miles south of Milan.

1984 Lancia Beta 2.0 Volumex Coupe

Car is in excellent condition. Very rare, engine 2.0 liter supercharged. For any information please contact: lorenzo.blitto@libero.it. Thanks

A regular Beta Coupe will run you anywhere from $3,000 to $6,000 on average, with only the most exceptional, museum quality examples reaching towards the upper part of that range. This Volumex is on offer at $11,449. It appears this has 53,000 km (~ 33,000 mi) on the clock, not a surprise given the nice presentation. But over $10,000 for an almost 30 year old Beta? Given the car's reputation, I doubt it will bring those kind of numbers. Realistically, we might be looking at $7,000 to $8,000 at the maximum for this car.

-Paul

1958 Lancia Aurelia B24 S Convertible

One of the most stunning cars from the 1950s that doesn't get its fair share of attention is the Lancia Aurelia Convertible and Spyder. These cars were simply elegant, deriving their mechanicals from the Aurelia Berlina which had a 1-2-3 finish at the Targa Floria in 1952. Created mainly for the American market, a little more than 500 were ever built. They strike a bit of an Italian Corvette stance, but the similarities end there, as these sports cars featured a 2.5 liter V6 engine, a sliding pillar independent front suspension and a two piece driveshaft connected to a rear-mounted gearbox. This B24 S Convertible for sale near Turin is a rare chance to get your hands on a legendary design.

1958 Lancia Aurelia B24 S Cabriolet

Lancia Aurelia B24 S Convertible - Year 1958. One of the last built. Original Nardi special equipment. Matching numbers. Italian plate and papers. Homologued by ASI (Italian Historic Automobilclub) with the Gold plate and the maximum evaluation. This car has been sold new to USA. Back in Italy in 2000 and owned by a Fiat Managing Director. Restored at no expenses with supervision of Pininfarina. Now available in Turin, same place where this Lancia was born. This is an opportunity to acquire a Lancia Aurelia B24 in the same condition when this car left the Factory at the end of the fifties.

At the high end, expect to pay around $425,000 to $450,000 for a mint, late model Aurelia Convertible such as this. At $375,000, this is a pretty decent value, given the provenance and history involved. Sure, it might seem crazy to spend well into six figures for a Lancia when there are plenty of Ferraris from this era available, but hardcore enthusiasts will know you have something special and far ahead of its time. For the discerning collector, that fact alone is enough.

-Paul

1966 Fiat 500 Moretti

Founded in 1925, the Moretti Motor Company was involved with the manufacturing of motorcycles and microcars over the years, along with some commercial vehicles during World War II. They would eventually stop producing cars of their own design in the 1950s, instead focusing on derivatives of popular Fiat models of the time. Other than the stubby wheelbase and the name, you would be hard pressed to figure out this 500 Moretti shares its architecture with the Cinquecento, the vehicle which put Italy on wheels after WWII.

1966 Fiat 500 Moretti

Extremely rare car built by Moretti based on Fiat 500. Completely original. Two owners since new. Original matching engine. Sold new in Turin. Original registration plate and papers. Ready to enjoy on the road!

Less than 50 of these little couples were said to have ever been built, which is not surprising given Moretti's modest output when it came to other models. With no reserve, there is a lot of bidding interest, which is not surprising given this car's rarity. A 500 Moretti in similar condition sold at RM Auctions in 2006 for $7,150. Have values moved on much? Given the return of the Fiat 500 to the US market, along with what vintage Cinquecentos are selling for these days, I'd suspect this car will bring a bit more. It might not reach the levels of certain Abarth models, but if someone wanted to go vintage rallying, this would be amazing little piece to show up in.

-Paul

1984 Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet

The Ferrari Mondial gets a bad rap amongst exotic car connoisseurs. Whether it's the styling proportions or the theory that it is the "lesser" Ferrari, I've heard it all. For those who really must have a Prancing Horse on the hood, you can't beat their value, though. In some cases, you can get into a Mondial for under $20,000, but to snag a good example that won't put you in the poor house, anything within the $20,000 range will buy you a good one these days. This early Mondial for sale in Florida looks to have received a repaint along with aftermarket wheels along the way. With a recent engine out service, this could potentially be a good entrance into the Ferrari club.

1984 Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet

NOW IS THE TIME TO OWN A FERRARI. Up for trade or sale is my Convertible Mondial Ferrari that seats four. I have owned this car for almost 4 years and have maintained the highest standards. Buy or trade with confidence as I will allow the Master Ferrari Technician who has worked on it, to give full details and history since I have owned. Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet Convertible features a 3.2L V8 FI SOHC 8 cyl Gasoline engine. Own the ultimate driving machine "FERRARI." The vehicle is Blue with a Blue Leather interior. 34,000 original miles, major service completed @ 31,500 miles (Engine out). Additional services completed @ 33,000 miles - 1984 Ferrari Mondial Quattrovalvole Cabriolet 2+2 VIN: ZFFUC15A0E0049711

At $23,900, we're a little over the mid point of where these open roofed Mondials are selling these days. If the seller was willing to offer up detailed service records and move a little more towards the $20,000 mark, it would be a decent value. Thanks to our reader Tim for bringing this ride to our attention!

-Paul

1993 Ferrari 512TR

We featured a Ferrari F512M last Friday and the same dealer now has that car's predecessor for sale: the 512TR. This car is slightly more used with close to 30,000 miles on the clock, but with less fussier styling and in classic Rosso Corsa, it doesn't disappoint.

1992 Ferrari 512TR

Very clean 512TR. Fresh timing belt service by us. Red with tan. This is the more advanced version of the Testarossa.

I prefer the looks of the 512TR over the F512M, even if it is down a little bit of horsepower, as it pays better homage to Pininfarina's original vision for the Testarossa. You can't argue that these cars have presence, no matter how brash you think they might be. Given the mileage, the seller is a little optimistic on the pricing, as we'd probably struggle to reach six figures on a good day. Somewhere between $80,000 to $95,000 would be more realistic for this red head.

-Paul

1985 Maserati Quattroporte

Today, the Maserati Quattroporte has become the luxury sedan choice for those seeking something a little more harder edged than what's on offer from the German executive car establishment. In one short decade, its amazing how successful Maserati has become. Success in large part due to this sedan. But success wasn't always a given with Maserati. The earlier Series III Quattroporte wasn't as successful, with just a shade over 2,000 built over a ten year production run during the era of the Biturbo, which did much to tarnish the image of the Trident brand. Rarely seen on the streets these days, this Series III Quattroporte for sale in Michigan has covered but 35,000 miles.

1985 Maserati Quattroporte

This auction is for this rare and immaculate 1985 Maserati Quattroporte, V8, automatic, leather, all power. Unbelievably clean. Drives so smooth and takes bumps like a new car. I drove it many times on the freeway up to 90mph and it handled like a new car. Has exhaust manifold leak and it is a little noisier than normal. Tires are dry and I suggest replacing all tires. The rest of the car is in excellent condition. Must see to believe.

It's a given that a thorough mechanical inspection would be needed for this car and it would have been good if the seller would have highlighted what records were available for this car. Good Series III Quattroportes are fairly obscure collector vehicles and as such, prices have been kept to a dull roar. The best Quattroporte may run you around $10,000 to $15,000; I would suspect this car might bring somewhere between $5,000 and $7,000.

-Paul