1960 Fiat 600 Convertible

The Fiat 600 is often overshadowed by its more diminutive counterpart, the 500, but this car deserves credit in its own right. Slightly larger than the 500, it offered greater interior space and a rear mounted, water cooled, overhead valve inline four cylinder engine. As a result of its upgraded mechanicals, the car had better heating and cooling characteristics. From 1955 through 1969, over 2.6 million 600s were produced at the Mirafiori factory. After production ceased, this car continued in production under several different brands, most notably Seat in Spain, the German concern Neckar (which made use of an old NSU plant) and Zastava in Yugoslavia, where the car ultimately ceased production in 1985. Good 600s are much less common than 500s these days, and this pastel green example for sale in California strikes a decidedly late 1950s pose.

1960 Fiat 600 Convertible

This is a very, very rare rust free 1960 Fiat 600 convertible. This car was found in the dry Arizona environment and has a subsequent two year old ground up restoration that brought new life to this little beauty. Painted in a factory sea foam green color, this particular car is the more desirable U.S. version with oversized “bug eye” or “frog eye” headlights required to meet U.S. standards back in the day. The equally rare and highly desirable suicide doors make this car a standout for the Fiat or Italian car collector. What was considered a “convertible” top on this car is really more like a huge sunroof that opens the full length of the passenger compartment. Brakes, 4 speed transmission and the 4 cylinder water cooled engine have all been redone along with upholstery, convertible top and floor covering. The engine was bored slightly and given a very mild cam along with an ultra rare Abarth header adding extra pep to the original 29 HP factory engine. That extra “pep” makes a difference in this little car. No detail has been overlooked and even includes a hard to find jack/tire changing kit. This model served as the base for the now infamous and highly coveted Fiat Jolly 600 beach car. But if you can’t get your hands on a Jolly, this is the next best thing and perhaps as equally unique with its full roof length “convertible” top.

I have owned a variety of cars over the years from luxury, muscle, sports and high performance and can tell you that this car has gotten more attention than any of those. Therefore be prepared to turn a lot of heads, receive a lot of thumbs up, be paid a lot of compliments and have pictures taken of it. With Fiat’s recent reintroduction success in the U.S., this car should only go up in value. Now for the big question, why am I selling it? Simple answer: I’m unloading a lot of toys including three other collector cars that I no longer drive much and that are taking up too much room. I will try and answer any questions you might have with my limited mechanical knowledge.

The level of care taken in this car’s restoration is admirable. The pictures of the undercarriage are also a nice touch, as these were not the most rust proof vehicles, to put it mildly. Since the car was found in Arizona, this is a good omen for what looks to be a fairly solid car. Even though 600s are less common than 500s, it doesn’t seem to affect value that much. One could expect a 600 in top shape such as this to net around $14,000 to $18,000. If the right buyer is found, the sale price may reach over $20,000, but that territory is usually reserved for the less common Multipla and Jolly variants.

-Paul

2001 Ferrari F550 Barchetta

From 1996 through 2006, the Ferrari F550 and F575M were admired for bringing back front-engine, V12 cache back to the house of the Prancing Horse. Before the F550 gave way to the F575M in 2001, an open roofed version of the F550 was introduced, the F550 Barchetta. A roadster in the truest sense of the word, Ferrari offered this car with a soft top, but advised owners not to exceed 70 mph with the top on. Only 448 were produced, along with 10 prototypes. Apparently the compromise of the roof up speed limit led Ferrari to take a different route with the open roofed F575 variant, the Superamerica. This was more of a targa version, however, with an interesting glass roof that articulated 180 degrees to lie flat over the trunk lid. A few more of those were produced, this time 559 left the factory. This example for sale in New Jersey is the earlier Barchetta version and is practically new with just over 3,000 miles.

2001 Ferrari F550 Barchetta

The seller of this Barchetta offered zero information about this particular car, which is a shame, given these cars are quite rare. The open roofed F550s and F575s tend to command higher values than their hardtop variants. Prices tend to range anywhere from $130,000 to $200,000 these days, depending on mileage and service history. I've never liked these open roofed variants, as they are compromised not only in usability but in the looks department. The hardtop F550 was so aesthetically pleasing that I couldn't imagine hacking the roof off. But, to each their own. Most people that would own a Barchetta have a stable of exotic iron to choose from on a day to day basis. But even if I was that wealthy, I'd still go for the cheaper and more usable hardtop.

-Paul

1967 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 TI

Austerity is a term thrown about liberally in this harsh economic climate. One segment of the consumer market that austerity seems to have ill effect, however, is the current new vehicle market. Not too long ago, luxuries such as power windows, air conditioning and power steering would have been reserved for higher end vehicles. Nowadays, you would be hard pressed to find any of these features lacking on the most affordable of vehicles. The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300TI was the most basic of Giulias, with a single carb, 1.3 liter engine good for 77 horsepower mated to a 4-speed manual. This made it the only Giulia to not have a 5-speed gearbox, other than automatic models. Few of these 1300s were sold outside Italy, even though they were still an enjoyable drive. This 1300TI for sale in Denmark had a heart transplant to a 2.0 liter engine, which ups the fun quotient, even if it takes a bit away from originality.

1967 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 TI

Six years ago we imported this Giulia 1300 TI from the Netherlands. Its Danish owner has now decided to move on to another classic and we are delighted to offer this fine Giulia once again. It has been upgraded with a 2 liter engine and not least the corresponding 2 liter rear axle with the high ratio gearing and 25% limited slip differential. Color is the correct Blu Ollandese and the upholstry has been redone in tan leather. Body, mechanics and interior in excellent condition and the Giulia is a real joy to drive. Wheels are period and rare design Cromodora alloys. All in all a really competent package that will please any discerning alfista.

For $15,000 USD, this is a tad pricy for a US buyer looking for a clean Giulia and the originality factor is not here with this one. Still, even though this car is modified, it has been done tastefully. If it were $1,000 to $3,000 cheaper, it would certainly be tempting, as the dark blue color is sublime on this Alfa. I've always been a fan of the way the offset headlamps give this car an aggressive look. It has been my dream to own a classic Alfa one day, and a Giulia like this is certainly one of the top three models I'll be considering.

-Paul

1983 Lancia Delta 1500

When it was introduced in 1979, few could believe that the Lancia Delta would eventually go on to be the vehicle that would win six World Rally Championships in a row for Lancia, from 1987 to 1992. But before the four wheel drive arrived, before the championships began to amass, there was the car you see before you here. Introduced in 1979, the original Delta featured a 1.5 liter four cylinder engine with 85 horsepower, front-wheel drive and squared off lines penned by Giorgetto Giugiaro. The combination was attractive enough to win the European Car of the Year award for 1980. This like new example residing in the Netherlands is possibly one of the best examples of an early Delta left.

1983 Lancia Delta 1500

The Lancia Delta was introduced in 1979 and was voted European Car of the Year in 1980 by an international jury. It was a Giorgietto Giugiaro design. With the total concept of the Delta with its transversal mounted engine, front wheel drive and independent suspension a new era began in the Lancia history. The engine’s of the Delta had 1300 cc and 1500 cc with 75 hp and 85 hp. The larger engine had electronic ignition. The Delta was manufactured on a computer controlled assembly line, a guarantee for a better than average quality. From 1980 until 1986 the Delta was exported to the Scandinavian countries as "Saab-Lancia 600." Later the Delta was very successful in many international rallies in the HF Integrale version until the early nineties.

The 1983 Lancia Delta 1500 of the 1st series now available at Montagna ha had only one previous lady owner from Germany who drove 62.600 km with the car. The car is in an extraordinary condition and looks, drives and handles like a new car, a real collector’s item!

For a thirty year old vehicle, this Lancia is in amazing condition. Showroom condition is a term often thrown about on vehicle forecoruts, but this car lives up to that hype. For $7,500 USD, this is an amazing piece of Lancia history. Even if it isn't one of the faster Integrale versions, the appeal of this car lies beyond speed. This was where an icon began.

-Paul

1988 Ferrari Testarossa

The Ferrari Testarossa is one of those cars that needs no introduction. Instantly recognizable even to those who aren’t car enthusiasts, this was a car that defined a generation in the 1980s and whose moxy still reverberates in the automotive world to this day. This example for sale in Massachusetts has but 5,600 miles on the clock, is in very original condition and comes with all records and receipts.

1988 Ferrari Testarossa

What we have here is a near perfect 1988 Ferrari Testarossa with 5,600 miles on the odometer. The car is finished in a beautiful factory Bronze Metallic with a full tan leather interior. This car has to be seen to be appreciated. This 1988 Ferrari Testarossa comes with AC, PW, PB, PL, PS and has the original radio that is non-functional; I've often wondered who listens to the radio when driving a Ferrari! We have service records and history for the car and would love to discuss any aspect of this beautiful machine with anyone who has questions. This car's color combination makes this Ferrari special. I've seen more red and yellow Ferraris in my life-time than I ever needed to see but the subtlety of this metallic bronze with the tan interior is both stunning and sophisticated; a true winner.

Even by Ferrari standards, this is very low mileage for an example of one of the brashest supercars to emerge from the 1980s. The very best Testarossas of this vintage may bring anywhere between $60,000 to $70,000. The shade of bronze on this example could be a deciding factor on this car’s final value. Some may love it, others, well, it may not be loud enough. I actually like it. I think subtle colors really show off the Testarossa’s flamboyant lines quite well.

-Paul

1989 Maserati Spyder

By the late 1980s, Maserati was winding down operations in the US market. The Biturbo had done its damage to the reputation of the company and Maserati left the US market entirely in 1991. Before they left, however, they gave us this, the Spyder, which was the first Maserati in thirty years designed by Zagato. With a shortened wheelbase, this open roofed car was strictly a two seater. Like Biturbos, there are a decent amount of worn out Spyders hanging around on the used market, so finding a good one takes some perseverance. This automatic version in California is cosmetically sound, but could mechanical issues lurk underneath?

1989 Maserati Spyder

Up for bid is a 1989 Maserati Spyder convertible. Everything in this car is factory and original. I am selling this on behalf of the original owner, a lady in her late 70s who bought it brand-new for over $100,000 in 1989 and now does not have the ability to handle this car. Based on the service record book, the majority of miles were put on the vehicle during the first few years of ownership. The last fifteen years haven't had a lot of miles put on it. The factory service record book, factory service manual, and leather/suede factory owner's manual are included.

This car is in extremely good condition. This car has always been in the garage. The paint and interior are all original! The paint is still that bright factory Maserati red. The interior is mostly a grainy, creamy leather, with side panels in a creamy grey suede; the dash is in a light blue suede (very striking and unusual - typical Italian style!).

I have been driving the vehicle for the last few weeks to prepare it for selling as it has been garaged for a long time without being driven. I just had brand-new tires installed (including the spare). From driving the vehicle, here is what I have noticed: It's a little cold-blooded when starting it up in the morning, but the starting has been getting better and better the more the car is driven. It may need further tune-up work. The heating and a/c work, but the blower motor is going out. The speedometer sticks occasionally, but the sticking has decreased in frequency the more the car has been driven. The odomter and tripometer are working fine. All of the windows are working fine; all of the gauges seem to be working fine. The electric trunk release button and fuel door release button seem to be working fine. The car handles great and drives nice.

All in all, this car is in great shape, especially considering the year. It is a very clean, well-maintained car. With a little TLC, you will have an exceptional car. You'll be hard-pressed to find one as clean as this.

The one thing that alarms me about this car is that it sat for quite some time without being driven. Cars like these need to stretch their legs and be given an Italian tune up, from time to time. With that said, the seller has made an effort to be as honest as possible. The most you may see one of these later model Spyders go for would be around $15,000. With a no reserve auction, we'll probably see a car like this crest just a bit over $10,000, as I suspect the automatic transmission may hold it back a bit.

-Paul

1974 Fiat 850 Carrozzeria Coriasco Truck

Here's something you don't see every day: a Fiat pickup truck. While rear engined trucks like the Volkswagen Transporter and Chevrolet Corvair Rampside are nothing new, these Fiat 850 trucks are much more rare on US shores. Built by Carrozzeria Coriasco, a coachbuilder who focused mainly on commercial applications, this 850 truck apes the VW Transporter in that it has a shallow bed and fold down side panels, uncovering storage area underneath the bed which isn't taken up by the engine. This example for sale in Arizona has had a nice cosmetic and mechanical freshening and is ready for light hauling.

1974 Fiat 850 Coriasco Truck

1974 Fiat 850 Carrozzeria Coriasco Truck. Fresh 903 cc high compression engine. John Edwards special intake with new Empi carb. P.B.S Engineering header with turbo muffler. New base clear coat paint. New Brakes. Tires like new. Polished headlight rings with Carrello headlights. Front bumper triple plated. Original Carrozzeria Coriasco floor mats. Truck runs and drives excellent. This is perhaps the ONLY Carrozzeria Coriasco Truck in the U.S. Clear Arizona title. Reserve the right to end auction early.

This truck would be great for a small business owner looking to attract some attention or could be employed as the perfect chase vehicle for your cadre of Abarth classics. Something this rare is almost always impossible to put a value on, but if I had to take a stab, I'd say $15,000 to $20,000 would probably be a good estimate. This truck is just so quirky you can't help but love it. I mean, who would even think to put a spare tire right in the middle of the passenger compartment?

-Paul

1976 Fiat 131 Abarth

Declared one of the greatest handling rally cars of its time, the Fiat 131 raised the bar in the 1970s. Derived from a modest saloon car package, the 131 Abarth combined the best efforts from Fiat and Abarth into a fiberglass body employing the 2.0 liter 16 valve four cylinder engine from the Lancia Beta. Along with a fully adjustable suspension, this allowed engineers to perfect the setup for a varying degree of road surfaces. The car captured the manufacturer’s title in 1979 along with winning one of rallying’s toughest competitions, Finland’s 1000 Lakes. This 131 Abarth for sale in Spain is an example of the 400 produced for homologation purposes.

1976 Fiat 131 Abarth

Fiat 131 Abarth. Very good condition. All original except carburation (it is fitted with two twin choke 44 IDF Weber carbs). Rare original blue colour. Spanish plates.

131 Abarths do not come cheap, and this blue treat is no exception. At a little over $60,000 USD, this is about average for what these cars are commanding today. The shade of blue is especially attractive, as it sets off the fender flares and is quite a departure from the usual red in which you see these cars painted.

-Paul

1972 Lancia Fulvia 1.3S

I wasn't your ordinary teenager. When my peers were pouring over tarted up Japanese subcompacts and muscle cars, I had different ideas. I always wanted a Lancia Fulvia. The looks, the oddity of a V4 engine with a 5 speed dogleg gearbox and the rally pedigree were enough to get me hooked. I still haven't experienced the pleasure of owning a Fulvia, or any Italian car, for that matter. Being the determined person I am, however, I know I will achieve that goal someday. Unlike a few Fulvias we've featured recently, this one isn't residing in the old world. It's right here in New York.

1972 Lancia Fulvia 1.3S

This is a absolutely beautiful Red 1972 Lancia Fulvia 1.3S coupe, all restored to its original condition. The 1972 Lancia Fulvia is special because in this year it made automotive history by winning the International Rally Championship. This car is a 5 speed manual transmission and its a blast to drive! This car was professionally maintained in Italy before being shipped by its only owner. The owner is a distinguished Italian gentleman that collects cars. He is a long time member of the Italian racing club Scuderia del Castello Alcamo and this car is his show baby.

That being said this car is in excellent condition. The interior is soft black leather with no rips or tears. The dash has no cracks and the wood is perfect. The body has no rust and the lines of this car are perfectly aligned (as you can see in the pictures). The chrome is in excellent condition around the windows and bumpers. The motor and clutch was restored in Italy before being shipped, since then the car is has been mechanically kept by and well known Italian mechanic and the car has been kept in a temperature controlled garage. Mechanically the car is in excellent condition and no expense has been spared! I want to make sure that you when you bid and buy this car you buy it with confidence! So in an effort to be totally transparent this car is a 9.5 out of 10. It has does have a rip on the roof lining 3 inches long, the lining is original and it was white and a little dirty. The paint has some minor chips, under a half inch and less then 5. The rocker panel chrome is a little worn (I'll post the picture). If you Google this car, 1972 Lancia Fulvia you will see what they are going for! This car reserve will be way way below what most people want for this car.

Average prices for Fulvias that reside stateside are averaging around the $15,000 to $20,000, with the very best examples reaching into the $20,000 range. Enthusiasts in the US are beginning to recognize just how significant these vehicles are and soon you'll see values of these trend closer to the legendary Alfa Romeo GTV Coupes. If this car could be had for right around the $15,000 mark, it would be a smart buy and a very savvy way to get into the hobby of classic Italian car ownership. It certainly is well presented and shows little in the way of modification.

And the exhaust note is intoxicating...

-Paul

1959 Fiat Abarth 2200

Having been a car enthusiast for many years, there are still vehicles I come across from time to time that I had no idea existed. Such is the case with this Fiat Abarth 2200. This car has hints of Ferrari and Maserati about it, and possibly a bit of GAZ 21 Volga in the rear flanks. Considering the looks, it is rather surprising to find this coupe is based on Fiat's executive car of the day, the 1800/2100 saloon. Bodied by Allemano, it features an enlarged, triple carb version of the 2100's inline six cylinder engine, which was designed by Aurelio Lampredi of Ferrari V12 fame. This particular Abarth 2200 has a unique ownership history and currently resides in The Netherlands.

1959 Fiat Abarth 2200

As the story goes, this Abarth 2200 was purchased off of the floor at the 1962 Turin Auto Salon by Briggs Cunningham for his wife who promptly rejected the gift after the car was already imported to New Jersey. The car was totally restored in black in 1988, and the only other similar coupe in existence remains in a museum in Italy after it was originally owned by Carlo Abarth’s wife. Cunningham added the spoke wheels stateside and photos are included which show it with original steel wheels and hubcaps. The car has been with the same owner for the last 20 years since the restoration, but has been somewhat neglected as it needs electrical sorting and exterior freshening. The 6-cylinder engine has three Weber carbs and produced 140hp when new. This is an impressive specimen and the rarity and connection to Cunningham are both very interesting. Show cars were often rolled off the stage and used daily back in this time period, and we’ve seen many of the Italian one-off designs grabbing big money on the auction stages lately. A great driver with the Abarth-tuned engine.

This is one very pretty coupe with an impressive history tied to two very famous motorsport icons. Considering that, along with the rare performance hardware seen under the hood, the price of $70,000 USD doesn't seem too unreasonable, especially when you take into consideration what smaller Abarth models have been selling for these days. With a bit of TLC, this could make for a very nice usable classic, one which could very well appreciate in the coming years.

-Paul